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Special offer on Elim baptistry

Elim BaptistryThe ‘Elim Standard’ is on offer until Easter 2015.  This tank, 11′ long, 5′ wide and 4′ deep, comes free with reinforced lids for £6000+delivery.  The ‘Elim Compact ‘ 3m long 1.5m wide and 1m deep (only the British could mix their units so happily!!) is on offer for £5800.

All our baptismal tanks are insulated as standard.

Contact David at BaptistryUK +00 44(0)345 230 1381

Piping up about pipes

We’ve a short blog today to share our thoughts on different kinds of piping. There are three main types: lay flat pipe, hose pipe and crushproof pipe. So what are the pros and cons?

Lay flat pipe is what you’ll find when you hire a baptistry from us: it makes your postage cheaper as they’re lighter and flatter to transport. However, we replace them regularly as they don’t have a long shelf life. So we’d suggest a lay flat pipe if storage space or the ability to transport the baptistry are your main concerns.

Hosepipe is the easiest to source and you may already have a hosepipe to hand. It maintains water pressure and is made from durable material so it works well.

Crushproof piping will last longest, it’s tough and durable and doesn’t usually kink. It comes in 30 metre rolls so it’s best if your toilet or drain is some way from the baptistry. However, it is the most expensive piping of the three.  Where crush-proof really excels is in emptying the pool with a pump, you still need a hosepipe to fill it.  It allows the pump to get up to full speed because there are no kinks to stop the water.

You can also upgrade from lay flat to crushproof piping for £15 when you hire a baptistry from us.

We’re here to talk if you want to ask anything specific about your booking, just ring us on 0345 230 1381.

Special Hire Offer


Nonagon and Croydon flat-pack baptistries are £165 if booked before Christmas!croydon sm Croydon 10 sided baptistry Contact Ruth 0345 230 1381.Croydon 10 sided baptistry

What are my options to fix a leaky baptistry?

We share David’s advice from on his many years working out solutions for our customers. This advice covers common problems encountered with concrete and tile pools. If you have a lead-lined pool, it’s better to get in touch directly.

Most of the older baptisteries that we come across are tiled concrete. They do look impressive when installed, but eventually they begin to leak and they aren’t easy to fix. That’s why we use a more reliable glass reinforced plastic (GRP) liner.

Some of your options are determined by what conditions you currently have. Does the existing pool have steps? Can they be removed? Is there any access to the outer or undersides of the tank? The dimensions of the existing pool are also important as they can limit the scope for repair and replacements.

Other decisions need to be based on your best understanding of the urgency of the situation. Water leaking from a baptistry may be minor, or it may be causing damp and starting to undermine your building. We have options to suit different budgets and, because our team has years of experience, we will always give you options to keep costs down.

What are your options?

Option one

The cleanest solution is to demolish the existing pool. We can make new insulated GRP tank to fit. You may be able to reuse elements of the old tank, such as the floor as a firm base, or the water supply and drainage.

Option two

It’s not always possible to demolish an old baptistry but, if the steps can be removed, then a GRP liner the size of the pool can slip inside the existing space. However this obviously does shrink the space in the pool because the sides of the pool will be between 35 and 60mm thick. This option needs:

  • An existing baptistry that retains its original shape
  • A way to get the new pool liner into place: an entrance that is as wide and tall as your existing baptistry

Option three

We can reline your pool in place, which is useful if there’s no large entranceway for a new liner. We would recommend that any steps are removed by a local builder first as lining around them costs more and risks leaks. We would prefabricate sheets of GRP (with a tile pattern if preferred), make new steps and then bring them to your chuch and install. The advantage with this method is that you keep the shape of the old baptistry, reuse existing plumbing, and don’t need a large access point. It’s quite labour-intensive and costs around the same as option one.

Option four

In some churches, it is easier just to close up the leaking pool altogether and begin to use a baptistry that can be dismantled when not in use. The former pool could be used as storage space for the new flat-pack pool. We offer a variety of models, depending on the size and depth that you prefer, and you can choose to purchase or to hire baptisteries from us as you need them. This is much more cost-effective and you flexible on where you place the pool. This option needs:

  • Someone willing to put together and dismantle the baptistry when needed.

Option five

It is worth understanding the options available to you to repair the existing baptistry – while we would suggest that specialist paints aren’t likely to be reliable long term, rubber paints and pond paints will make a temporary repair. Also, do speak to a local tradesperson about retiling and grouting. Sometimes it is possible to create additional water-holding features between the new tiles and the concrete.

Speaking as a church treasurer, David recommends that you factor into your options the fact that a repaired concrete and tiled pool needs an ongoing maintenance budget in a way that a GRP lined pool doesn’t.

What next?

Having read through the options, do get in touch with some photos and measurements and we can talk through how to help: +44345 230 1381

In conversation with… Steve Haskett

We ask Steve from All Saints Anchorsholme about their experience with the Galilee baptistry.

Did you like the pool?

“Yes, we loved it, the size was great and I really loved the way it was assembled – I managed to do it myself in a reasonable length of time. The heater was a brilliant addition. Loved the double layer liner and the floor pads too.”

Did you find the pool easy to assemble and disassemble?

“Yes. The water pump was particularly useful – it emptied the pool in no time.”

Did the instructions make sense?

“Yes it was very straightforward, thank you”

How was delivery and collection?

“Colleagues collected and returned the pool. It easily fitted into an average family sized hatchback. One thing of note – we managed to do this for the cost of the courier one way!” [That’s a really good point, as courier charges can look high, until you work out your own costs to do it…]

Any last thoughts?

“Thank you! We felt that the cost of the kit was very reasonable taking into account it was complete with absolutely everything that was required!”

Special offer – wooden hexagonal pool

clip_image002_0000We have one of the wooden hexagonal baptistry pools for sale. Made with beech-veneered wood, these are very much in keeping with church interiors, as the picture of it in Bradford Cathedral shows. The pool is approximately 5′ across and 2’2″ deep. It slots together in a very neat way and needs no tools for assembly. The pool will come with new equipment, new liner but no heater.

Price £650+£50 delivery +VAT

 

Fibreglass Pools over Concrete and Tiles

A fibreglass baptistry tank has many advantages over a concrete and tile pit. Usually, it is cheaper in terms of building costs but where it shows its superiority is in its zero-maintenance.

Installation of a single-piece tank is quicker nor is it always necessary to have plumbing for drains or even filling – there are a range of options to suit the needs, budget and situation of the church.

Further savings can be made because our tanks are insulated as standard.

And you can choose your colour! And we make reinforced lids.

Lids (Part 2)

We’ve had another design break-through, one that saves you money. Once a baptistry gets above 1.75m in width, the lids need extra reinforcement if there is to be no flex in the lids. Up to now this has been done by using thicker timbers (which might use up valuable space) or by using stainless steel box-section tubes, which are expensive. Both options get heavy too. Now we can use box-section tubes of compressed GRP. The cost falls between timber and steel and the weight issues are avoided.

The Croydon – A New 10-sided Baptismal

Croydon 10 sided baptistry

We put the nonagon up recently and, when we came to put the liner on we found the liner too big and a side too many – we’d accidentally forgotten a panel and made an octagon. As the panels went together just as well with one missing, we tried it with one extra. Ten sides worked too and it gave a pool that is catching on. It is wider than our ‘workhorse’ pool the nonagon but not any deeper. As the first church to try it and buy it was in Croydon, the name stuck. It is a cost-effective way to get a large baptistry tank (nearly 7′ across) that can be stored easily and doesn’t required the larger steps of our deeper baptistry (The Apostle).

Baptistries Insulated as Standard

Insulated baptistry tank

The new range of our baptistries have insulation as standard – this saves £400 on the price and a lot in heating costs in the long run. Insulation is difficult to do with concrete and tile baptismals.

Elim style simply means the steps are an integral part of the baptistry and not a separate unit fixed in place afterward, so a whole range of dimensions, depths and configurations are possible. And, as we make timber moulds for each job, you can have bespoke at the price of ‘off-the-peg’.